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From the Publisher:
Imagine an everyday world in which the price of gasoline (and oil) continues to go up, and up, and up. Think about the immediate impact that would have on our lives.

Of course, everybody already knows how about gasoline has affected our driving habits. People can’t wait to junk their gas-guzzling SUVs for a new Prius. But there are more, not-so-obvious changes on the horizon that Chris Steiner tracks brilliantly in this provocative work.

Consider the following societal changes: people who own homes in far-off suburbs will soon realize that there’s no longer any market for their houses (reason: nobody wants to live too far away because it’s too expensive to commute to work). Telecommuting will begin to expand rapidly. Trains will become the mode of national transportation (as it used to be) as the price of flying becomes prohibitive. Families will begin to migrate southward as the price of heating northern homes in the winter is too pricey. Cheap everyday items that are comprised of plastic will go away because of the rising price to produce them (plastic is derived from oil). And this is just the beginning of a huge and overwhelming domino effect that our way of life will undergo in the years to come.

Steiner, an engineer by training before turning to journalism, sees how this simple but constant rise in oil and gas prices will totally re-structure our lifestyle. But what may be surprising to readers is that all of these changes may not be negative – but actually will usher in some new and very promising aspects of our society.

Steiner will probe how the liberation of technology and innovation, triggered by climbing gas prices, will change our lives. The book may start as an alarmist’s exercise…. but don’t be misled. The future will be exhilarating.

My Review:
‘$20 per Gallon’ is a fascinating book about the future of high gas prices. I was amazed at how much our lives depend on cheap gas. Some changes he predicts will be welcome changes, such as more energy efficient cars and a return to U.S. based manufacturing. However, ridiculously high airline tickets and the disappearance of sushi here were not so appealing as gas prices increase.

This book was definitely eye-opening with lots of predictions, backed with statistics and studies. It is a very relevant topic for the 21st century and a must read.

I was initially reluctant to request this book, because I didn’t know if it would be interesting enough to read the entire book for a review. I am very glad I read this book because it was educational and enjoyable. I highly recommend ‘$20 per Gallon’ and am pleased I will be able to share with book with my readers.

Listen to an excerpt here
Official website here

The Giveaway:
I have 5 copies of ‘$20 per Gallon’ by Christopher Steiner to giveaway thanks to Hachette Book Group. You can earn up to 5 entries for this giveaway. Please leave a separate comment for each entry and a way to contact you.

First Entry
1. Leave a comment telling me how (if at all) your life changed when gas prices peaked over $4 per gallon last summer. Please leave an email or way to contact you if you win.

Bonus Entries
2. Subscribe to my free newsletter here and leave me another comment. Current subscribers or followers just leave a comment saying you subscribe/follow to get an extra entry.

Enter your email address:

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3. Follow me on twitter and tweet about this giveaway and leave a comment. Include @momsavesmoney in the tweet.

4. Grab my button and leave another comment with your site’s url.

5. Blog about the giveaway and leave another comment with the link to the post.

This contest will end on Friday July 31, 2009 at 10:00 pm, central time. I will use random.org to select five lucky winners and contact the winners. (If any winner does not respond in 48 hours, I will pick another.) U.S. and Canada entries only. No P.O. Boxes. Good luck and thanks for entering!

{ 65 comments… add one }
  • Sharon July 18, 2009, 4:56 am

    We were paying almost $5 a gallon for diesel fuel for our very large F350 truck. We just stopped going anywhere that we absolutely did not have to go.

    searcher7105 at gmail dot com

    Reply
  • Sharon July 18, 2009, 4:57 am

    I subscribe

    searcher7105 at gmail dot com

    Reply
  • Sharon July 18, 2009, 5:01 am

    tweet! http://twitter.com/searcher7105

    searcher7105 at gmail dot com

    Reply
  • Anne July 18, 2009, 5:03 am

    I’m not sure if it was because of gas prices or because we had a new baby and we exausted but we didn’t go on vacation as much – we only took one and we carpooled with family, sharing gas costs.

    Reply
  • Anne July 18, 2009, 5:03 am Reply
  • Elizabeth Mather July 18, 2009, 4:29 pm

    We cut back on where we went and tried to combine errands into fewer trips.
    Sounds like a great book!

    Reply
  • caityelise July 18, 2009, 5:13 pm

    With $4 gas, my family tried to carefully coordinate trips for errands to reduce our driving as much as possible!

    Reply
  • caityelise July 18, 2009, 5:13 pm

    also… new subscriber!

    Reply
  • demmi July 18, 2009, 8:12 pm

    I already combine errands it affected the prize of many things that I bought so I had no control over that con5459(at)gmail(dot)com

    Reply
  • demmi July 18, 2009, 8:13 pm

    I have your button on my blog http://www.luckyrosiescreations.blogspot.com/

    Reply
  • Nancy July 18, 2009, 8:22 pm

    When gas was $4. a gallon, we seriously started combining errands on trips in the car. We also stopped going for “fun” drives in the country for a little outing. Even today, we are gas price spotters, noting the posted price whever we go.

    Nancy
    allibrary (at) aol (dot) com

    Reply
  • Nancy July 18, 2009, 8:23 pm

    I am an e-mail subscriber.

    Nancy
    allibrary (at) aol (dot) com

    Reply
  • April Vereb July 18, 2009, 8:39 pm

    When gas prices got that high, I stopped running around spur-of-the-moment and made a day to get everything done at once to save on gas.

    april_vereb(at)yahoo(dot)com

    Reply
  • April Vereb July 18, 2009, 8:39 pm

    I subscribe to your newsletter! 🙂

    april_vereb(at)yahoo(dot)com

    Reply
  • Anonymous July 18, 2009, 8:56 pm

    I stopped driving my SUV for almost a year, with gas prices and being unemployed. My daughter has a 1984 Tercel which we shared, although it took advanced planning and was inconvient at times. I started driving my SUV just a few weeks ago, but if gas starts going any higher I’ll have to park it again. I would sell it, but we have a business that requires pulling a trailer at times and its the only vehicle we have that can do that. Besides, if the whole family wants to go somwhere (5 of us) we need a car large enough to do so. I really dont like how dependant we have become on oil.
    There are alot of points in this book I find very interesting…I hope I win a copy!

    Jeannie
    adamsmom711@yahoo.com

    Reply
  • Anonymous July 18, 2009, 8:58 pm

    I already subscibe to your newsletter..(its great!). I wish I understood twitter…

    Jeannie
    adamsmom711@yahoo.com

    Reply
  • amanda July 18, 2009, 9:25 pm

    I do as little driving as possible, so I wasn’t able to drive less when gas prices were high. Every time I filled up I left the pump feeling down and frustrated… the high cost really hurt my bank account and I knew it was out of my control.
    oheeyore at hotmail dot com

    Reply
  • amanda July 18, 2009, 9:25 pm

    email subscriber
    oheeyore at hotmail dot com

    Reply
  • valerie2350 July 18, 2009, 9:58 pm

    we cut wayyyy back with our driving and really thought about whether or not that drive was necessary

    Reply
  • valerie2350 July 18, 2009, 9:59 pm

    subscribe

    Reply
  • valerie2350 July 18, 2009, 9:59 pm Reply
  • valerie2350 July 18, 2009, 10:00 pm Reply
  • theladya July 18, 2009, 10:41 pm

    We cut way back on our driving, not so many evening drives. We also didn’t go on a big vacation. abailey_crace@yahoo.com

    Reply
  • Anonymous July 18, 2009, 11:30 pm

    i don’t get to see 2 of my kids that are in college that much because of the price of gas.
    deefna at gmail dot com

    Reply
  • Anonymous July 18, 2009, 11:31 pm

    i subscribe via email
    deefna at gmail dot com

    Reply
  • Anonymous July 18, 2009, 11:32 pm

    i follow on twitter and tweeted about giveaway
    @deefna

    deefna at gmail dot com

    Reply
  • alicia July 18, 2009, 11:32 pm

    I cut back on driving to my bf’s house b/c it’s a 45 min drive. Hope he still loves me!

    Reply
  • alicia July 18, 2009, 11:35 pm

    I cut out going to my bf’s house as much. It’s a 45 min drive. I hope he still loves me!

    bamagrl98@yahoo.com

    Reply
  • alicia July 18, 2009, 11:35 pm

    have your button

    bamagrl98@yahoo.com

    Reply
  • alicia July 18, 2009, 11:36 pm Reply
  • alicia July 18, 2009, 11:37 pm Reply
  • Renee July 19, 2009, 3:08 am

    My goodness–when gas went up grocery prices skyrocketed! And they are still on the rise in my area.

    Reply
  • Sunnymay July 19, 2009, 3:28 am

    When gas prices went up, my driving for fun went down. I still leave “get lost time”, but now I sweat with every mile the wrong way from my destination. I rethink errand shopping to make a circle and consolidate trips. In fact, I’m shopping a lot less with the gas up and economy down. I weigh each purchase for need vs. want. I carpool more for the company and to save gas and wear ‘n tear on my car. I also watch the tachometer to know when I’m in the zone, by not accelerating too fast, unless on a ramp or passing on the freeway.
    I receive your newsletter.

    Reply
  • Gwengom July 19, 2009, 4:39 pm

    Looks like a good read!
    I thought twice before driving anywhere lastsummer!

    Reply
  • cksknitter July 19, 2009, 6:58 pm

    Since we live under 5 miles from my husband’s work, the high price of gas didn’t affect us as much as others. We stopped making one-stop trips and combined errands.
    Chrissy at knittoday@hotmail.com

    Reply
  • cksknitter July 19, 2009, 6:58 pm

    I’m a subscriber.
    Chrissy at knittoday(at)hotmail(dot)com

    Reply
  • Terri July 19, 2009, 11:00 pm

    High price of gas pushed up cost of trucking so groceries went up. The upside for us was that we eliminated a lot of costly junk foods and began eating healthier. Also, we use cloths instead of paper towels & napkins to save $ and we combine errands into one main car trip instead of several. We made many other changes that will stay with us.
    vinter@warwick.net

    Reply
  • Terri July 19, 2009, 11:02 pm

    email subscriber
    vinter@warwick.net

    Reply
  • Shelly July 20, 2009, 4:43 pm

    Combined errands and drove a little slower

    Reply
  • Shelly July 20, 2009, 4:43 pm Reply
  • Shelly July 20, 2009, 4:44 pm

    follower

    Reply
  • Shelly July 20, 2009, 4:44 pm

    email subscriber

    Reply
  • K. Rock July 20, 2009, 6:34 pm

    We had to start an account for the sole purpose of budgeting gas money. We were jsut able to get rid of it.

    Reply
  • Marie July 22, 2009, 3:29 pm

    We cut down going to the store once or twice a week instead of everyday and my husband stop coming home for lunch.

    mccataquet(at)comcast(dot)net

    Reply
  • Misusedinnocence July 23, 2009, 4:29 am

    I actually had to leave my last job, because gas was just too expensive to drive 40 miles. It was a blessing too though because it means more time with my family, but harder because of the lack of money.

    misusedinnocence@aol.com

    Reply
  • Anonymous July 25, 2009, 9:48 pm

    I planned trips to multi-task, walked more locally, and hunted for the cheapest station that I was going to be near. I’m so glad it’s not last summer, but many of the habits have stuck. I would love to read what the author has to say.

    satcphile1@yahoo.com

    Reply
  • Ashley Phillips July 26, 2009, 2:22 pm

    We just did not go very many places.
    Thanks,
    Ashleyphillips76@gmail.com

    Reply
  • bettycd July 26, 2009, 8:25 pm

    I reverted to very few shopping trips and purchasing what I needed from a single close by store. Just couldn’t justify driving to multiple stores to buy a few sale items.

    Reply
  • bettycd July 26, 2009, 8:26 pm

    email subscriber

    Reply
  • Laura July 26, 2009, 11:43 pm

    My husband and I started using my car to drive everywhere because it gets much better gas mileage than his truck!

    Reply
  • Laura July 26, 2009, 11:43 pm

    I subscribe via email.

    Reply
  • Glenn July 27, 2009, 4:05 pm

    Combined trips, drove less “non-essential” trips, kept the speed down on the highway, which in itself gave me 15% to 20% better gas mileage. Thanks for the giveaway!

    glenn_pessano AT yahoo DOT com

    Reply
  • Satsuki Rebel July 28, 2009, 3:30 pm

    I don’t recall my life changing that much actually. I’ve always combined trips and been mindful of gas consumption. The only real difference was in my budgeting.

    Reply
  • Rebecca N. July 28, 2009, 4:12 pm

    Because of the high gas prices, we stopped going to my parents home for dinner every Sunday like we used to. We started alternating and having them out to our home every other Sunday. It has worked out well! Thanks for the great giveaway! I’ve been very interested in reading this book for quite some time now. Hope I get lucky!

    Reply
  • Rebecca N. July 28, 2009, 4:16 pm Reply
  • Smart Cents Mom July 29, 2009, 1:56 am

    I didn’t drive as much. I tried to combine all my errands into one trip. But still the costs added up! So I also didn’t buy as many things and I started cutting costs such as changing my cell phone plan to a much cheaper plan. Thanks
    for the chance to win!

    skstigger@hotmail.com

    Reply
  • Smart Cents Mom July 29, 2009, 1:57 am

    I am a subscriber! Thanks!

    skstigger@hotmail.com

    Reply
  • yadgirl July 29, 2009, 3:18 am

    My life changed very little when gas prices peaked.

    Reply
  • yadgirl July 29, 2009, 3:22 am Reply
  • Christy Lee July 30, 2009, 12:52 am

    My life only changed in that I couldn’t afford to do anything but drive. That was awful.
    Thanks for the giveaway!

    Christy
    sheridesthatbigredhonda@Yahoo.com

    Reply
  • Christy Lee July 30, 2009, 12:52 am

    I’m a subscriber!

    Christy
    sheridesthatbigredhonda@Yahoo.com

    Reply
  • Brenda July 31, 2009, 3:17 am

    We try to have at least one day where we don’t start the car up at all!
    dancealert(at)aol(dot)com

    Reply
  • Brenda July 31, 2009, 3:18 am

    I’m a subscriber!
    dancealert(at)aol(dot)com

    Reply
  • Sara July 31, 2009, 3:40 pm

    My husband is a landscaper. Between the truck and the fuel for his equipment things in our house became very tight.

    skkmiller (at) live (dot) com

    Reply
  • Sara July 31, 2009, 3:41 pm

    I subscribe.

    skkmiller (at) live (dot) com

    Reply

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